A Place for Jewish Values
A Vibrant and Growing Jewish Congregation
Celebrating Sacred Moments
A Place for Jewish Values
Our Mission
A Vibrant and Growing Jewish Community
Our Mission
Celebrating Sacred Moments
A Vibrant and Growing Jewish Congregation
A Place for Jewish Values

A Place for Jewish Values

We hope to offer a warm and nurturing environment for everyone who walks through our doors.

A Vibrant and Growing Jewish Congregation

We hope to provide a warm and nurturing environment for everyone who walks through our doors.

Celebrating Sacred Moments

“The old shall be new and the new shall be sacred.” – Rav Kook

A Place for Jewish Values

We hope to provide a warm and nurturing environment for everyone who walks through our doors.

Our Mission

We offer a caring and inclusive congregation that prays together, builds Jewish Community through acts of Tikkun Olam (repairing the world), shares life's events and provides education for all ages.

A Vibrant and Growing Jewish Community

We hope to provide a warm and nurturing environment for everyone who walks through our doors.

Our Mission

We offer a caring and inclusive congregation that prays together, builds Jewish Community through acts of Tikkun Olam (repairing the world), shares life's events and provides education for all ages.

Celebrating Sacred Moments

“The old shall be new and the new shall be sacred.” – Rav Kook

A Vibrant and Growing Jewish Congregation

We hope to provide a warm and nurturing environment for everyone who walks through our doors.

A Place for Jewish Values

We hope to provide a warm and nurturing environment for everyone who walks through our doors.

Narrowing the Gap + The Art of Stillness
Erev Rosh HaShana 2015–5776
Or Chadash
Rabbi Joseph M. Forman

Shana Tova. Happy New Year. It is wonderful to see all of you tonight, and I hope that this New Year brings the blessings of health, of prosperity, and of purposeful living to us all.

 

As you probably know, the past few months at Or Chadash have been relatively quiet, as the summer season usually is. That gentler pace gives Cantor Kathy, Betsy, our leadership and me time to recharge ourselves and begin planning for the New Year.

 

What you might not realize is that as much as we appreciate the quieter days, we also miss the excitement of having you here, and so we look forward to having you back for the High Holy Days and our many fall programs. Welcome home. And welcome to all of you joining us for the first time.

 

As summer can provide an opportunity for us to relax and enjoy the outdoors, as I do, or spend time traveling, seeing new places or perhaps old friends, catching up on our bucket list, or our To-Do list, the High Holy Days are a time for something quite different.  The words in our Machzor, our High Holy Day prayerbook, urge us to declare: 

"Chadesh Aleinu Shana Tova - Renew us for a year of goodness."

And indeed renewal is a vital goal for the New Year.  And perhaps, for many of us, that is why we return to Or Chadash, to renew our spiritual life and to re-engage with our Jewish community and reconnect with the highest of our Jewish values.

 

But the New Year and these high holy days are meant to to be something more.  

They are meant to jar us out of our normal way of going about living. The Book of Leviticus calls Rosh Hashanah Yom Teruah, a Day of Loud Blasts – not just to blow the shofar for the sake of ritual, but to be called to action by its sound.  

 

The purpose of Rosh Hashanah is not to be restorative, but to be transformative. Rather then us seeing the New Year as a time to renew our spirits or imagine that the return to synagogue involvement is a chance to reacquaint ourselves with our sacred past, we are to mark these days that we might change; that we might better ourselves. 

 

How often in the course of our lives do any of us harbor thoughts of what we might do had we the time, the strength, the freedom, the will, the opportunity?  

 

Our tradition calls this self-reflection Cheshbon HaNefesh, taking an inventory or accounting of our very being.  And when we look closely at ourselves, we might find that in some arena we are nowhere near the person we hope to be.  We are not quite the parent or friend we wish we could be.  We have not invested the time in doing the things we really want to do, being with the people who matter most to us, exerting the self-control we know a better us might have done.  When we look critically at ourselves, we see all too readily that there is, for every one of us, a gap between who and what and how we are, and who and what and how we would like to be.

 

And what we need is not more time to achieve our goals, but time better spent focusing on where we ought to be headed.  Like the suggestion on the hand-made scratch-off we sent to all of you: List the things that make you happy.  List the things you do.  Compare and adjust accordingly.  

 

The Jewish New Year, then, offers us a gift. A challenge – yes; but a gift!

 

These days of awe – no longer meant to frighten us with divine judgment, are meant to inspire us to adjust our lives for the better.  These days of awe can be a blessing that our tradition gives to us, really a blessing we give to ourselves to confront the reality of our lives, examine the places we know we have come up short, and then, with strength and purpose, narrow the gap between who we are now and who in the New Year we wish to be.

 

In his most recent book, the Road to Character, New York Times op Ed columnist and author David Brooks writes of this very task.  He speaks of narrowing the gap between our ideal self and our actual self. 

 

Brooks, poking a bit of fun at himself as a pundit and columnist, writes: "I'm paid to be a narcissistic blowhard, to volley my opinions, to appear more confident about them than I really am, to appear smarter than I really am, to appear better and more authoritative than I really am." (RTC, p. xiv). 

 

And other than the getting paid for it part, he could be describing anyone of us who wishes to see ourselves as smarter, better, more confidant and authoritative than in truth we are.  But he goes on to address the nature of human character in all its forms – sharing beautiful stories of the lives of others that at times reveal deficiencies of kindness, patience, love, and tolerance.

 

Our task, he reminds us, is to move the needle.

 

"Character is not innate nor automatic,” Brooks states. “You have to build it with effort and artistry. You can't be the good person you want to be unless you wage this campaign [to better yourself]."  (RTC, p. 12.) 

 

But Brooks was not the first well-known Jewish writer to contemplate the nature of Character.  In the 12th Century, Rabbi Moses Maimonides, born in Spain and then living in North Africa, wrote: “Do not imagine that character is determined at birth. We have been given free will. Any person can be as righteous as Moses or as wicked as Jeroboam. We ourselves decide whether to make ourselves learned or ignorant, compassionate or cruel, generous or miserly. No one forces us, no one decides for us, no one drags us along one path or the other; we ourselves, by our own volition, choose our own way.”

 

The scratch-off calendar everyone received for the New Year offered several activities to move us a bit closer to a better version of ourselves.  One scratch-off suggested that we sorely lack the time to contemplate our own lives. These high holy days give us a fantastic excuse to be a little bit self-centered and encourage us to focus on ourselves – not just doing more of what we do, but examining what we do with the time we have.  

 

So what prevents us from doing this on a regular basis? The British-born essayist and novelist, and now a TED-Talk speaker, Pico Iyer, gives one answer. 

 

"The more ways we have to connect, the more we seem desperate to unplug. In our madly accelerating world, our lives are crowded, chaotic and noisy. We need permission to be still!"

 

In his book The Art of Stillness Pico Iyer goes on to say: "In an age of speed, I began to think, nothing could be more invigorating than going slow. In an age of distraction, nothing can feel more luxurious than paying attention. And in an age of constant movement, nothing is more urgent than sitting still. You can go on vacation to Paris or Hawaii or New Orleans three months from now, and you'll have a tremendous time, I'm sure. But if you want to come back feeling new – alive and full of fresh hope and in love with the world – I think the place to visit may be nowhere.”  (TAOS p66).

 

Stillness, he writes, is what we need to transform ourselves.

I can share my own experience with this, highlighted during my Bikram yoga practice.  Over the course of 90 minutes in 105° heat, we engage in 26 poses. In-between each pose we rest, ideally, motionless. Savasana, literally "dead man's pose", is considered the most difficult posture to master. It's less than a minute, and we are all hot and exhausted. 

You would think it would be easy to not move. You would think after exercising in that heat and getting your heart racing, every one of us would lie still as a stone. 

But no. Somehow, stillness is the most challenging of the poses. We cannot stop moving.  Every tick, every need to wipe sweat from our brows, is indulged. And some cannot even be silent. They need to groan and whisper. Stillness, in far too many of us, is a lost art. 

 

In the Book of Kings (I Kings 19:11-13) the prophet Elijah sought to experience the reality of God.  The text tells us: Elijah stood on the mountain and felt the wind blow the rocks. He saw that God was not in the wind.  And then the mountain shook, an earthquake; yet God was not in the earthquake; and after the earthquake, a fire. But God was not in the fire. And after the fire, a still, small voice.

 

That quiet voice is the voice within each of us. We need to be still in order to hear it! We need to turn off the blowing of the wind, the shaking earth, the rattling noises, the burning desire to do every activity that work and school and friends and family and community propose to us. 

 

We need – for our own sake – to hear the still small voice that can help us reach toward the divine that resides within ourselves. 

 

And that is perhaps where the spiritual New Year, this Rosh Hashanah, finds purpose. Yes we sing and pray and stand and sit and listen to melodies historic and new. And yes, we declare tonight that the world is now 5776 years old, despite our awareness that in truth it is 4.5 billion years old and its origins are far more dramatic than the authors of Genesis could have conceived.

 

But tonight, as a sacred Kehillah, a holy congregation, united in our desire to give meaning to our time on this tiny planet, tonight we come together to be reminded that our sacred calling for the New Year is to transform ourselves. 

 

How we go about this -- that is ours to determine. 

Whether we will succeed, is now our challenge. 

And who shall join us in our struggle, those decisions remain our private ones. 

 

But together, as a Jewish community, tonight we begin this journey to narrow the gap between the person we are and the one we hope to be, between the life we have today and the one we can imagine in our dreams. May this New Year find each of us, in stillness, moving closer to that ideal. 

 

Shana Tova. 

 

Amen.

Shana Tova. Happy New Year. It is wonderful to see all of you tonight, and I 
 
hope that this New Year brings the blessings of health, of prosperity, and of 
 
purposeful living to us all.
 
As you probably know, the past few months at Or Chadash have been relatively 
 
quiet, as the summer season usually is. That gentler pace gives Cantor Kathy, 
 
Betsy, our leadership and me time to recharge ourselves and begin planning for 
 
the New Year.
 
What you might not realize is that as much as we appreciate the quieter days, 
 
we also miss the excitement of having you here, and so we look forward to 
 
having you back for the High Holy Days and our many fall programs. Welcome 
 
home. And welcome to all of you joining us for the first time.
 
As summer can provide an opportunity for us to relax and enjoy the outdoors, 
 
as I do, or spend time traveling, seeing new places or perhaps old friends, 
 
catching up on our bucket list, or our To-Do list, the High Holy Days are a time 
 
for something quite different.  The words in our Machzor, our High Holy Day 
 
prayerbook, urge us to declare: 
 
"Chadesh Aleinu Shana Tova - Renew us for a year of goodness."
 
And indeed renewal is a vital goal for the New Year.  And perhaps, for many of 
 
us, that is why we return to Or Chadash, to renew our spiritual life and to re-
 
engage with our Jewish community and reconnect with the highest of our 
 
Jewish values.
 
But the New Year and these high holy days are meant to to be something more.  
 
They are meant to jar us out of our normal way of going about living. The Book 
 
of Leviticus calls Rosh Hashanah Yom Teruah, a Day of Loud Blasts – not just 
 
to blow the shofar for the sake of ritual, but to be called to action by its sound.  
 
The purpose of Rosh Hashanah is not to be restorative, but to be 
 
transformative. Rather then us seeing the New Year as a time to renew our 
 
spirits or imagine that the return to synagogue involvement is a chance to 
 
reacquaint ourselves with our sacred past, we are to mark these days that we 
 
might change; that we might better ourselves. 
 
How often in the course of our lives do any of us harbor thoughts of what we 
 
might do had we the time, the strength, the freedom, the will, the opportunity?  
 
Our tradition calls this self-reflection Cheshbon HaNefesh, taking an inventory 
 
or accounting of our very being.  And when we look closely at ourselves, we 
 
might find that in some arena we are nowhere near the person we hope to be.  
 
We are not quite the parent or friend we wish we could be.  We have not 
 
invested the time in doing the things we really want to do, being with the people 
 
who matter most to us, exerting the self-control we know a better us might have 
 
done.  When we look critically at ourselves, we see all too readily that there is, 
 
for every one of us, a gap between who and what and how we are, and who and 
 
what and how we would like to be.
 
And what we need is not more time to achieve our goals, but time better spent 
 
focusing on where we ought to be headed.  Like the suggestion on the hand-
 
made scratch-off we sent to all of you: List the things that make you happy.  List 
 
the things you do.  Compare and adjust accordingly.  
 
The Jewish New Year, then, offers us a gift. A challenge – yes; but a gift!
 
These days of awe – no longer meant to frighten us with divine judgment, are 
 
meant to inspire us to adjust our lives for the better.  These days of awe can be 
 
a blessing that our tradition gives to us, really a blessing we give to ourselves to 
 
confront the reality of our lives, examine the places we know we have come up 
 
short, and then, with strength and purpose, narrow the gap between who we are 
 
now and who in the New Year we wish to be.
 
In his most recent book, the Road to Character, New York Times op Ed 
 
columnist and author David Brooks writes of this very task.  He speaks of 
 
narrowing the gap between our ideal self and our actual self. 
 
Brooks, poking a bit of fun at himself as a pundit and columnist, writes: "I'm paid 
 
to be a narcissistic blowhard, to volley my opinions, to appear more confident 
 
about them than I really am, to appear smarter than I really am, to appear better 
 
and more authoritative than I really am." (RTC, p. xiv). 
 
And other than the getting paid for it part, he could be describing anyone of us 
 
who wishes to see ourselves as smarter, better, more confidant and 
 
authoritative than in truth we are.  But he goes on to address the nature of 
 
human character in all its forms – sharing beautiful stories of the lives of others 
 
that at times reveal deficiencies of kindness, patience, love, and tolerance.
 
Our task, he reminds us, is to move the needle.
 
"Character is not innate nor automatic,” Brooks states. “You have to build it with 
 
effort and artistry. You can't be the good person you want to be unless you 
 
wage this campaign [to better yourself]."  (RTC, p. 12.) 
 
But Brooks was not the first well-known Jewish writer to contemplate the nature 
 
of Character.  In the 12th Century, Rabbi Moses Maimonides, born in Spain and 
 
then living in North Africa, wrote: “Do not imagine that character is determined 
 
at birth. We have been given free will. Any person can be as righteous as 
 
Moses or as wicked as Jeroboam. We ourselves decide whether to make 
 
ourselves learned or ignorant, compassionate or cruel, generous or miserly. No 
 
one forces us, no one decides for us, no one drags us along one path or the 
 
other; we ourselves, by our own volition, choose our own way.”
 
The scratch-off calendar everyone received for the New Year offered several 
 
activities to move us a bit closer to a better version of ourselves.  One scratch-
 
off suggested that we sorely lack the time to contemplate our own lives. These 
 
high holy days give us a fantastic excuse to be a little bit self-centered and 
 
encourage us to focus on ourselves – not just doing more of what we do, but 
 
examining what we do with the time we have.  
 
So what prevents us from doing this on a regular basis? The British-born 
 
essayist and novelist, and now a TED-Talk speaker, Pico Iyer, gives one 
 
answer. 
 
"The more ways we have to connect, the more we seem desperate to unplug. In 
 
our madly accelerating world, our lives are crowded, chaotic and noisy. We 
 
need permission to be still!"
 
In his book The Art of Stillness Pico Iyer goes on to say: "In an age of speed, I 
 
began to think, nothing could be more invigorating than going slow. In an age of 
 
distraction, nothing can feel more luxurious than paying attention. And in an age 
 
of constant movement, nothing is more urgent than sitting still. You can go on 
 
vacation to Paris or Hawaii or New Orleans three months from now, and you'll 
 
have a tremendous time, I'm sure. But if you want to come back feeling new 
 
– alive and full of fresh hope and in love with the world – I think the place to visit 
 
may be nowhere.”  (TAOS p66).
 
Stillness, her writes, is what we need to transform ourselves.
 
I can share my own experience with this, highlighted during my Bikram yoga 
 
practice.  Over the course of 90 minutes in 105° heat, we engage in 26 poses. 
 
In-between each pose we rest, ideally, motionless. 
 
Savasana, literally "dead man's pose", is considered the most difficult posture to 
 
master. It's less than a minute, and we are all hot and exhausted. 
 
You would think it would be easy to not move. You would think after exercising 
 
in that heat and getting your heart racing, every one of us would lie still as a 
 
stone. 
 
But no. Somehow, stillness is the most challenging of the poses. We cannot 
 
stop moving.  Every tick, every need to wipe sweat from our brows, is indulged. 
 
And some cannot even be silent. They need to groan and whisper. Stillness, in 
 
far too many of us, is a lost art. 
 
In the Book of Kings (I Kings 19:11-13) the prophet Elijah sought to experience 
 
the reality of God.  The text tells us: Elijah stood on the mountain and felt the 
 
wind blow the rocks. He saw that God was not in the wind.  And then the 
 
mountain shook, an earthquake; yet God was not in the earthquake; and after 
 
the earthquake, a fire. But God was not in the fire. And after the fire, a still, small 
 
voice.
 
That quiet voice is the voice within each of us. We need to be still in order to 
 
hear it! We need to turn off the blowing of the wind, the shaking earth, the 
 
rattling noises, the burning desire to do every activity that work and school and 
 
friends and family and community propose to us. 
 
We need – for our own sake – to hear the still small voice that can help us reach 
 
toward the divine that resides within ourselves. 
 
And that is perhaps where the spiritual New Year, this Rosh Hashanah, finds 
 
purpose. Yes we sing and pray and stand and sit and listen to melodies historic 
 
and new. And yes, we declare tonight that the world is now 5776 years old, 
 
despite our awareness that in truth it is 4.5 billion years old and its origins are 
 
far more dramatic than the authors of Genesis could have conceived.
 
But tonight, as a sacred Kehillah, a holy congregation, united in our desire to 
 
give meaning to our time on this tiny planet, tonight we come together to be 
 
reminded that our sacred calling for the New Year is to transform ourselves. 
 
How we go about this -- that is ours to determine. 
 
Whether we will succeed, is now our challenge. 
 
And who shall join us in our struggle, those decisions remain our private ones. 
 
But together, as a Jewish community, tonight we begin this journey to narrow 
 
the gap between the person we are and the one we hope to be, between the life 
 
we have today and the one we can imagine in our dreams. May this New Year 
 
find each of us, in stillness, moving closer to that ideal. 
 
Shana Tova. 
 
Amen.

What's Happening at Or Chadash

THIS WEEK

Thursday, January 18th - RELIGIOUS SCHOOL, GRADE 7
Grade 7, 4:30 - 6:30 PM

Friday, January 19th -  FANTASTIC FRIDAY SHABBAT, 7:00 PM
"Generations: The Synagogues of Newark" - A Film by Ricky Rainey.  Learn the history of Newark's Synagogues. Go inside the buildings that defined the Jewish journey in New Jersey - B'nai Jeshurun, B'nai Abraham and Oheb Shalom. Travel with a young man studying to become a Bar Mitzvah, and see him discover history, heritage and community.

 Fantastic Friday Synagogues of Newark

Sunday, January 21st - RELIGIOUS SCHOOL, GRADES K-6

Grades 3, 4, 5, and 6, 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Grades K, 1, and 2, 10:15 AM - 12:00 PM

Sunday, January 21st - TEMPLE TOTS, 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Click here to RSVP


Sunday, January 21st - SISTERHOOD WALK, 10:15 AM
Want to meet some new people, or catch up with friends you only see in the hallways of OC or while waiting to pick up your children? Join us monthly for either a quick walk, and/or a quick coffee klatch!  We never seem to have time to get together, so a nice walk and talk during Hebrew school on Sundays seemed to be just the thing! We will meet at the front door of Or Chadash at 10:15 AM and take a 30 minute walk up Foothill Road. We will return to OC at 10:45 AM for coffee and treats. IF you prefer not to walk, meet us for coffee at 11:00 AM. We hope to see some new and familiar faces. Any questions, please contact Lisa Tauscher (tauscher3@comcast.net) or Debbie Weiss (deb1508@aol.com). 


LOOKING AHEAD

Thursday, January 25th - RELIGIOUS SCHOOL, GRADES 7-10
Grade 7, 4:30 - 6:30 PM
Grades 8, 9, and 10, 6:30 - 8:00 PM

Friday, January 26th - SHABBAT SHIRA, 7:00 PM
Friday, January 26, is our annual Shabbat Shira service, where we celebrate the crossing of the Red Sea in the Torah. The Torah states that Moses' sister, Miriam, and her companions sang their way across the sea. In honor of that event we hold a special musical service filled with song. I would like to offer an opportunity for musicians to participate in this service, please let me know if you would like to help out. We will have a rehearsal on Sunday, January 21, directly after religious school. Please contact me at kathygohr@gmail.com if you would like to participate.  Many Bles-sings, Cantor Kathy

Sunday, January 28th - RELIGIOUS SCHOOL, GRADES K-6
Grades 3, 4, 5, and 6, 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Grades K, 1, and 2, 10:15 AM - 12:00 PM

Sunday, January 28th - KUP O' JOE ADULT EDUCATION, 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Ever think about the conflict between what our tradition says about the universe (creation) and what we learn from science (evolution)?  What does Reform Judaism say about those two opposing ideas?  How do we think about God in the 21st Century if the sacred texts we treasure were written in a pre-scientific era?  Join Rabbi Forman for a relaxed and open discussion that will include looking at passages from Genesis, the Principles of Reform Judaism, and a taste of contemporary Jewish ideas of God.  Come to participate, to share, to learn or just to listen.  All are welcome.




A SNEAK PEEK AT OUR UPCOMING FANTASTIC FRIDAYS

Friday, February 23rd - FANTASTIC FRIDAY SHABBAT, 6:30 PM
Chinese Buffet Followed by a Film and Discussion on Climate Change

Fantastic Friday Global Warming 2



Membership Information

We thank you for your interest in Or Chadash.

Please click here to get to our membership page which contains information on what joining Or Chadash can mean for you.

To get the latest events and information on Or Chadash, subscribe to our e-newsletter.

 

Religious School Calendar

Click here to view the 2017/2018 5778 Religious School Calendar

Register for Temple Tots

Register for Temple Tots

Temple Tots is a one-hour program led by Rabbi Forman, Student Cantor Kathy Gohr, Educator Betsy Zalaznick and our Teaching Assistants. It offers enriched programming, story time, music and craft projects for pre-school aged children. This program meets on Sundays at 11:00 AM until Noon (ish) and is geared towards children ages 2 - 5 and their parents, grandparents, or caregivers.

Temple Tots will be held on select Sundays.

2017/2018 DATES
September 17
October 22
December 10
January 21
March 11
April 15

Teaching Assistants

Our Teaching Assistants are role models for our younger students and 
provide invaluable support.   You will be helping out teachers and students 
of Or Chadash Religious School.  

Click here for the TA Application.

Current TA's:  Click here to let us know if your schedule has changed and you will be unable to be at Religious School.



Sign Up to Usher

Usher Sign-ups:  

Sisterhood Sunday Morning Walks and Coffee Talks

Or Chadash Sisterhood Presents: 
Sunday Morning Trail Walks and Coffee Talks
Want to meet some new people, or catch up with friends you only see in the hallways of OC or while waiting to pick up your children? Join us monthly for either a quick walk, and/or a quick coffee klatch!  We never seem to have time to get together, so a nice walk and talk during Hebrew school on Sundays seemed to be just the thing! We will meet at the front door of Or Chadash at 10:15 AM and take a 30 minute walk up Foothill Road. We will return to OC at 10:45 AM for coffee and treats. IF you prefer not to walk, meet us for coffee at 10:45 AM. We hope to see some new and familiar faces. Any questions, please contact Lisa Tauscher (ltauscher@embarqmail.com) or Debbie Weiss (deb1508@aol.com). 

Everyone should ask at least ONE other person you know to join us!

Stay tuned for our fall schedule.

 

Sign up for Scrip today!

Shop with Scrip!

Purchase giftcards (“scrip”) online at face value, and Or Chadash gets a percentage of our purchases.  It’s easy to sign up!  It’s easy to order!  Click here to find easy instructions.

Legacy Circle

The Board of Or Chadash is proud to announce the implementation of our temple’s Legacy Program.

A Legacy gift symbolizes the true meaning of L’dor V’dor, passing on traditions from one generation to the next. To be part of the Legacy Program no upfront funds are needed, only your intention to leave a future gift of any amount which can be changed at your discretion any time in the future.

As part of the Legacy Program you will be honored as part of the Legacy Circle and have the opportunity to create your own page in the Book of Life in both hard copy and digital versions. Our response so far has been tremendous with 28 congregants joining the Legacy Program.

Further information about the Legacy Program and the Book of Life are available online:

Or Chadash Legacy Program

Or Chadash Book of Life

To join the Legacy Program or learn more, contact our Legacy Chairperson, Harvey Gold or a team member consisting of Adam Belkin, Rick Rosenthal, Renee Trambert and Debbie Weiss

LEGACY CIRCLE MEMBERS
Larry & Beatrice Abrams
Susan & Steve Albert
Adam & Audrey Belkin
Kimberly & Doug Beman
Jeff & Christine Berg
Jonathan & Alana Dambrot
Rabbi Joseph M. Forman
Dan & Jackie Freedman
Cantor Kathy Gohr
Harvey & Kathryn Gold
Steven Grumbach
Chris Hann & Leslie Werstein Hann
Alan Hecht & Maria Jose De La Hoz
Darren & Elizabeth Loew
David & Katherine Moutner
Gary & Susan Parilis
Nisim & Alexa Parliyan
Rick & Jill Rosenthal
The Senator/Graybeal Family
The Sloan/Gong Family
Louis & Caryn Speizer
Andy & Jane Stein
Rabbi Richard F. Steinbrink
Caryn & Marc Tomljanovich
Renee Trambert
Kimberly & David Turner
Glenn & Eve Wasserman
Ross & Susan Weinick
Debbie & Gary Weiss
Mark and Kristina Witzling
Betsy & Bruce Zalaznick

College Student Outreach

As fall approaches, the Student Outreach Program of Or Chadash is about to swing into full gear. The purpose of this program is to maintain a Jewish connection for our students away from home at preparatory, college or graduate schools. Students will be mailed a treat symbolic for some of the Jewish holidays. The Rabbi includes a delightful letter reminding students of the significance of the occasion. Students tell us each year how much they look forward to these packages and how comforting it is to know that they are still important to our Or Chadash Family.

We create a new “Student Address List” each year, so all interested parents should send in their child’s address for the coming year as soon as possible. You must submit this each year, even if there has not been a change. You will notice that there is space for an email address. 

Don’t let your child miss out on the first mailing!

Click here to fill out the form.

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Calendar at a Glance

21Jan
01.21.2018 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
3-6th Religious School - 9AM - 12 PM
21Jan
01.21.2018 10:15 am - 12:00 pm
K-1-2nd Religious School - 10:15 am - 12:00 pm
21Jan
01.21.2018 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Temple Tots
21Jan
01.21.2018 12:15 pm - 4:00 pm
Board Meeting / Retreat

A Year at Or Chadash

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